Tuesday, October 1, 2019

Tania Coatigan in Cursive


My latest Fabricville blogger project was a bit of an outlier for me. But I was making it for the latest edition of the Fabricville newsletter, and the theme was Fall jackets.

I don't often make outerwear or even blazers, but I was looking for a fall jacket/sweater, and the first thing I thought of was the new Tania Coatigan by Jalie. This jacket-like cardigan without front closures is perfect to throw on over a dress to look instantly chic and keep yourself warm in the chillier days or nights of fall! It has the addition of angled seams and clever pockets for that extra appeal.



The recommended fabrics for this pattern are stable knits or linen; it gives different looks depending on the fabric you choose, from casual to dressy. The pattern also recommends that you use your high bust measurement for a fitted look, and your bust for a looser fit. This opens up so many options!

I’m a librarian and I love sewing with unexpected fabrics, so I really couldn’t resist this cotton drapery fabric - PK Studio Cursive Caps - from Fabricville for my choice for the Tania! Look at those beautiful cursive letters – I can’t wait to wear this to work.



Although not one of the recommended fabrics, it is fairly lightweight without any special coatings or treatments that can sometimes be found on upholstery fabrics. Thinking about the characteristics of the fabric, the drape, the weight, scale of the print, and so on, is vital when deciding to use an unusual fabric choice for any pattern. Think about the lines of the pattern and whether the fabric you’ve chosen will match with that. For example, this fabric wouldn’t work for anything full or gathered, but it works amazingly for something fitted, with structure.

These back seams are perfectly straight when this is hanging on a hanger; there is slightly
too much fabric in the upper back for my body & so they curve out when worn. Sigh.

I made very few alterations to the Tania. Jalie’s patterns are always very well drafted. Because I’m only 5’2”, I did shorten it slightly above the angled seams, and shortened the sleeve length by a couple of inches. I also increased the bicep of the sleeve by 1.5” because my fabric doesn’t have much give and I often find Jalie sleeves narrow for my body normally anyhow.



I made a few cosmetic changes too: to accent those angled seams I inserted some satin piping that I also found in the upholstery department! It took a little extra time and hand basting to ensure that the points matched up at the seams but it was worth it. Because this drapery fabric tends to fray easily, I also took the time to bind all the seams with seam binding tape. This was the lengthiest part of the process! So much pinning and careful sewing. And I finished the edges of my facing with some bias binding for a tidy and attractive edge.



Other than those changes, this was a quick sew, perfect for the enthusiastic beginner on up. This pattern has potential for many different versions. When I make it again, I’ll probably use a knit, and one change I’ll make is to make the body one size smaller for a snugger fit. After wearing for a bit, I find that there is a lot of volume in the lower back for my body so will just take it in a little at the centre back seam to adjust for that too. A great pattern and a wonderful, high quality fabric with a print that I love make this into a hit for me!



8 comments:

  1. That is a lovely jacket - great job!

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    1. Thank you! I am pleased with the result :)

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  2. Your garment looks amazing. And comfortable! And such finishing .... I love the piping etc. I understand the time it takes to bind seams, and although you may be the only person to appreciate the binding (because it is on the inside), you will think of it every time you put your jacket on.

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    1. Thank you! I do like the bound seams and appreciate them, as you say, even though nobody else sees them :)

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  3. this interpretation of the 'tania' rocks! if i made it, i'd make a small fisheye dart at either side of center back to account for my deeper waistline. unfortunately not necessary in front.--anne

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    1. Oh, that's a good idea. I do have a shallower back than front as well.... ;)

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  4. That looks amazing and very easy to wear! My son works for a library service company, the OCLC (Online Computer Library Center) that services 90,000 libraries world wide!
    Love reading your blog!

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    1. It is such an easy wear! (and easy make, really) How neat that your son works for OCLC - I certainly know about that company!

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